A Very Octocat U2F Key

GitHub now supports FIDO Universal 2nd Factor (U2F) as an option for two-factor authentication alongside their existing support for Google/Microsoft Authenticator Apps.

A Very Octocat U2F Key

Earlier this month GitHub announced, in partnership with Yubico, that they now support FIDO Universal 2nd Factor (U2F) as an option for two-factor authentication alongside their existing support for Google/Microsoft Authenticator Apps. With the announcement came a special offer: a special edition, Octocat adorned, Yubico U2F key for only $5!

A deal too good to pass up, especially as someone that has around ten services listed in their phone’s Authenticator app.

Naturally, I picked one up and added it to my GitHub account. Shipping to little old New Zealand was super-cheap, and super-fast.

n.b. It’s possible that this deal is still available, go to yubi.co/github and look for the “Special Offer for GitHub Users!” button.

The Setup Process, in Pictures

Assuming you have two-factor authentication enabled on your GitHub account, you’ll normally get asked for a six-digit code when you log in like this:

1-login-code

In order to add a U2F key to your account you’ll need to hit up your account settings, and edit your two-factor authentication settings under the security group:

2-settings

3-security

At the bottom of these settings, click on “Register new device” and you’ll be asked to insert the key and press the button (which will light up and flash.)

4-register

5-blink

Once you’ve pressed the button, the key will be added to your account and ready to help protect your account.

6-alldone

When you next log in, you’ll be able to just press the button again, gain access to your account very quickly.

7-signbackin

And if you happen to not have your key on you, you can still fall back on the other two-factor authentication methods.

8-backup

Now, how else can I use this thing?

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